Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Page: 16-24
Socio-Economic Status and Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Infants in a Ugandan Cross-Sectional Study
Ratib Mawa, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Caroline Kambugu Nabasirye, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Lira University, Lira, Uganda
James Mulira, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Catherine Nakidde, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Frank Kalyango, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Dolorence Mary Angulo Alaki Wakida, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Margaret Chota, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Tracy Leigh Schumacher, Department of Rural Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
Stephen Lawoko, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Krishna Nand Sharma, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda
Received: Mar. 28, 2019;       Accepted: May 5, 2019;       Published: Jun. 3, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfns.20190701.13      View  97      Downloads  15
Abstract
Nation-wide population based studies on socio-economic inequality in exclusive breastfeeding among infants is scarce in Uganda. This study examined the socio-economic inequality in exclusive breastfeeding among 1424 infants below 6 months of age in a nation-wide population based cross-sectional study. Self-reported maternal exclusive breastfeeding practice in the first six months of their last born baby`s life was the outcome of interest. Household wealth index and maternal occupation constituted the proxy measures of socio-economic status, the exposure variable of interest. The distribution of exclusive breastfeeding practice by infant-mother dyad characteristics was calculated by conducting bivariate analysis. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were then fitted to calculate the odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for exclusive breastfeeding by maternal occupation and household wealth index. The results showed that half of the infants were boys, close to half of their mothers were farmers, and 23% and 16.9% of the infants lived in the poorest and richest households respectively. Overall 67% of the infants were exclusively breastfed. The odds ratios for exclusive breastfeeding by maternal occupation were 0.62 (0.26-1.50) for infants whose mothers were professionals/technical/managers, 0.97(0.50-1.87) for clerical/sales, 0.78 (0.51-1.21), for Farmers, 0.72 (0.29-1.82) for Household/Domestic/Services, 0.72 (0.39-1.36) for skilled manual workers and 0.72 (0.25-2.02) for unskilled manual workers compared to infants of non-working mothers. The odds ratios for exclusive breastfeeding by household wealth index were 2.38 (1.30-4.33), for the poorest, 2.16 (1.18-3.96) poorer, 1.91 (1.10-3.48) middle, and 1.41 (0.75-2.64), for richer households compared to infants in the richest households. In conclusion, an inverse relationship was found between household socio-economic status and exclusive breastfeeding among infants below six months of age and inadequate evidence to conclude existence of an association between maternal socio-economic status and exclusive breastfeeding. Targeting exclusive breastfeeding interventions to mother-infant dyad living in affluent families might be important in reducing socio-economic inequality in exclusive breastfeeding among infants below six months of age in Uganda.
Keywords
Exclusive Breastfeeding, Socio-Economic Status, Infants, Uganda
To cite this article
Ratib Mawa, Caroline Kambugu Nabasirye, James Mulira, Catherine Nakidde, Frank Kalyango, Dolorence Mary Angulo Alaki Wakida, Margaret Chota, Tracy Leigh Schumacher, Stephen Lawoko, Krishna Nand Sharma, Socio-Economic Status and Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Infants in a Ugandan Cross-Sectional Study, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 16-24. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20190701.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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