Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2018, Page: 143-153
Fatty Acids, Triacylglycerol and Sn -2 Fatty Acids Distributions Variations in Seed Oil from Camellia Cultivars
Jianbo Liu, Hunan Yueyang Institute of Food and Quality Supervision Inspection and Research, Yueyang, P. R China
Zepeng Liao, Hunan Yueyang Institute of Food and Quality Supervision Inspection and Research, Yueyang, P. R China; School of Food Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, P. R China
Tingyou Sun, Hunan Yueyang Institute of Food and Quality Supervision Inspection and Research, Yueyang, P. R China
Na Feng, School of Food Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, P. R China
Qizhi Long, School of Food Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, P. R China
Haiyan Zhong, School of Food Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, P. R China; Key Laboratory of Cultivation and Protection for Non-Wood Forest Trees of Education Ministry, Changsha, P. R China
Bo Zhou, School of Food Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, P. R China; Hunan Key Laboratory of Processed Food for Special Medical Purpose, Changsha, P. R China; Key Laboratory of Cultivation and Protection for Non-Wood Forest Trees of Education Ministry, Changsha, P. R China
Received: Dec. 17, 2018;       Accepted: Jan. 5, 2019;       Published: Jan. 28, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfns.20180606.12      View  317      Downloads  64
Abstract
Camellia seed oil is widely used in the food, health, cosmetics and medicine industries in China. The present study aimed to investigate fatty acids, triacylglycerols (TGAs) and sn-2 fatty acids distributions variations in seed oil from 46 kinds of Camellia cultivars. The predominant fatty acids was oleic acid (18:1ω9) with 71.30% (average). The sn-2 position was mainly occupied by oleic acid, linoleic acid and palmitic acid. Fifteen TAGs species were found and the main TAGs were OOO + SLO, OOP and OOL+SLL. The trisaturated TAGs species were not detected. These results indicated significant changes in the profiles of fatty acids, sn-2 position fatty acids and TGAs, and in contents of these in seed oils from different Camellia cultivars (P< 0.05). Saturated fatty acids is not positively related to its distribution in sn-2 position. The data in present paper may be important as a reference for adulteration of camellia seed oil with other oils.
Keywords
Camellia Seed Oil, Fatty Acids, Triacylglycerols, sn-2 Fatty Acids, Camellia Cultivars
To cite this article
Jianbo Liu, Zepeng Liao, Tingyou Sun, Na Feng, Qizhi Long, Haiyan Zhong, Bo Zhou, Fatty Acids, Triacylglycerol and Sn -2 Fatty Acids Distributions Variations in Seed Oil from Camellia Cultivars, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2018, pp. 143-153. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20180606.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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