Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Page: 57-62
Development of a Competitive Enzyme Immunoassay Technique for the Detection of Soy Traces in Meat Products
Cellerino Karina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Rodríguez Viviana Gladys, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Docena Guillermo, Institute of Immunologic and Physiopathologic Studies - IIFP, School of Sciences, National University of La Plata, UNLP, La Plata, Argentina
López Laura Beatriz, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Received: Jan. 30, 2017;       Accepted: Mar. 22, 2017;       Published: Apr. 3, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfns.20170502.16      View  2028      Downloads  96
Abstract
The aim of this work was to develop a competitive enzyme immunoassay technique, to detect the presence of traces of soy in meat products. Specific rabbit polyclonal antiserum against soy protein was used as primary antibody. The optimal antigen concentration to be immobilized on the plate and the concentration of primary antibody to be used in competition was determined. The calibration curve was fitted using increasing concentrations of an extract of soy product. The soy product was extracted with Tris-HCl buffer 0.0625M with 3% sodium dodecylsulfate and 2% mercaptoethanol. The working range used in the enzyme immunoassay to detect soy was 9-280ppm SP with adequate linearity (R2: 0.9880). All validation parameters studied were appropriate. Commercial samples of meat products were analyzed with this enzyme immunoassays and a commercial ELISA kit. Significant differences were observed in the quantitative results obtained with both methods; nevertheless the developed enzyme immunoassay could be used as screening method.
Keywords
ELISA, Allergens, Soy Detection, Meat Products
To cite this article
Cellerino Karina, Rodríguez Viviana Gladys, Docena Guillermo, López Laura Beatriz, Development of a Competitive Enzyme Immunoassay Technique for the Detection of Soy Traces in Meat Products, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 57-62. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20170502.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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