Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Page: 251-258
Effect of Breakfast Eating Patterns and Anthropometric Measurements on Cognitive Function of Early Adolescents in Rural Area of Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia
Anchamo Anato Adole, School of Nutrition, Food Science and Technology, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Pragya Singh, Department of Public Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Fiji National Universityty, Suva, Fiji
Tafese Bosha, School of Nutrition, Food Science and Technology, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Beruk Berhanu Desalegn, School of Nutrition, Food Science and Technology, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Received: Nov. 10, 2015;       Accepted: Nov. 24, 2015;       Published: Dec. 25, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150306.19      View  4523      Downloads  108
Abstract
Background: Poor growth and breakfast eating patterns are associated with delayed mental development and that there is a relationship between impaired growth status and both poor performance and reduced intellectual achievements. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of breakfast eating patterns and anthropometric measurements on cognitive function among early adolescents in the Rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to July 2012. Structured questionnaire was used to capture breakfast eating patterns, socio-economic and demographic factors. Anthropometric status was measured using the UNICEF SECA weighing scale and shorr measuring board. Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-II tests was used for cognitive function measurement. A representative sample size of 211 participants was selected randomly from 4 kebeles. The data was analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 software and WHO anthroplus version 1.04. Results: Of the 208 interviewed, 52% were girls while 48% were boys with mean (±SD) age of 12.01±0.82 years. Breakfast skipping prevalence was 42.3%. Breakfast eating patterns and height-for-age Z score were significant predictors of Pattern Reasoning cognitive test scores (P<0.001). Body mass index for age Z score was a significant predictor (P<0.001) of a combined Simultaneous scale. Regular breakfast pattern, height for age and body mass index for age Z score were significantly (P<0.001) associated with Pattern Reasoning explaining 28.8% variation. Conclusion: Adolescents who were stunted and underweight had lower cognitive test scores compared to those who were normal as well as those who consume breakfast irregularly. Anthropometric status and breakfast eating patterns was significant predictor of cognitive function of adolescents in the study area. We recommended that, parents and adolescents should be educated and trained on healthy breakfast eating patterns and good nutrition practices for healthy cognitive development.
Keywords
Breakfast, Anthropometric Measurements, Cognitive Function, Adolescents, Southern Ethiopia
To cite this article
Anchamo Anato Adole, Pragya Singh, Tafese Bosha, Beruk Berhanu Desalegn, Effect of Breakfast Eating Patterns and Anthropometric Measurements on Cognitive Function of Early Adolescents in Rural Area of Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 251-258. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150306.19
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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