Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Page: 240-244
Evaluation of Chromium Composition of Commonly Consumed Leafy Vegetables Juice Selected from South West Nigeria
Kubura Temitope Odufuwa, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State, Nigeria
Moronke Muinat Adeyanju, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State, Nigeria
Charles Babatunde Adeosun, Department of Chemical Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria
Adeleke Kazeem Atunnise, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ogun State, Nigeria
Bamidele Adewale Salau, Department of Chemical Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria
Received: May 2, 2014;       Accepted: May 17, 2014;       Published: Dec. 14, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150306.17      View  4195      Downloads  103
Abstract
Chromium is necessary for insulin function, nutrient uptake and regulation of major metabolism as well as boosting of immune system amongst others; available in vegetables, the cheapest source for the majority of people living in developing countries. Seven commonly consumed vegetables in south west Nigeria were collected from four major markets in the region, thoroughly mixed and prepared for laboratory analysis. Each vegetables were shared into two groups (fresh and juice) and four replicates each, chromium content were determined using Atomic Absorbance Spectrophotometer. Highest chromium content was observed in Senecio biafrae (4.73±0.05) and it is significantly (p<0.05) higher than other experimented samples while, the least was observed in Piper guineense (0.89±0.30) and is significantly (p<0.05) lower than other fresh leafy vegetables. Among the juice extracts Senecio biafrae (29.80±2.11) contain the highest chromium content and significant difference (p>0.05) while, Corchorus oliterus (10.90±0.50) is significantly (p<0.05) lower than other vegetables. Comparatively, chromium content in juice extracts are significantly higher than their corresponding fresh vegetables. Therefore caution most be applied when juice of vegetables are to be ingested especially in Piper guineense which displayed a significantly increase chromium content when juiced.
Keywords
Processing, Chromium, Vegetables, Juice, Toxicity
To cite this article
Kubura Temitope Odufuwa, Moronke Muinat Adeyanju, Charles Babatunde Adeosun, Adeleke Kazeem Atunnise, Bamidele Adewale Salau, Evaluation of Chromium Composition of Commonly Consumed Leafy Vegetables Juice Selected from South West Nigeria, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 240-244. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150306.17
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